DOG DENTAL HEALTH

Gum disease (also known as periodontal disease) is one of the biggest threats to your dog’s well-being. It affects up to 80% of dogs by the age of three.1There’s more to dog dental health than just sparkling teeth and fresh breath. The effects of dental neglect can lead to damage to the jawbones and loss of teeth. It may even lead to disease, reduced immunity and infections that can spread to vital organs and cause serious damage. That’s why it’s crucial that dental check-ups are part of your pet's annual veterinary visit.

Brushing your dog’s teeth and feeding him a GREENIES Dental Chew are a great supplement to his oral care, but not a stand-in for regular clinical veterinary cleanings. One of the most common changes seen in older dogs is dental disease. Unless you've been diligent about your dog’s dental health, it's quite possible that your dog has some sort of dental disease.

Oral Care Terms

Plaque is a soft sticky film that forms when food debris, bacteria and proteins in the saliva combine and build-up on the tooth surface.

Tartar (or calculus)occurs when minerals in saliva combine with plaque to form a hardened yellow colored substance. Over time it may turn brownish red. Tartar adheres strongly to the tooth, requiring significant mechanical abrasion to remove it.

Causes of Dental Disease

Just like people, dogs accumulate plaque in the mouth from everyday activities like eating. Dog dental health problems are caused when plaque is left to build up and combine with bacteria found in the mouth. As plaque hardens, it forms tartar, which can cause painful reddening and inflammation of the gums (also known as gingivitis.)

The Four Stages of Oral Health

Stage 1: Healthy
Stage 2: Gingivitis
Stage 3: Early Periodontitis
Stage 4: Advanced Periodontitis

Prevalence of Dental Disorders in Pet Dogs; Kyllar, M. and Witter, K. Journal of Veterinary Medicine – Czech; 2005, Vol 50 (11): 496 – 505